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The gastronomy of the Camino de Santiago and its typical dishes

If you like gastronomy, the Camino de Santiago and its surroundings have a great variety of traditional cuisine that enters through the eyes and that conquers the palate. These are our 9 recommendations of dishes that you should not miss.

Gastronomía del Camino de Santiago | Wikimedia Commons

Gastronomía del Camino de Santiago | Wikimedia Commons

The gastronomy of the Camino de Santiago Francés

One of the greatest stimuli that the pilgrim can find, walking so many kilometers, is undoubtedly the rich and varied Spanish cuisine. In particular, if you go through the stages of the French Way, you will be in contact with an unrepeatable gastronomy and a large number of typical products, both in the north of the peninsula, and in autonomous communities such as Navarra, La Rioja, Castilla y León or Galicia.

At the end of each stage the pilgrim has the opportunity to discover a large number of typical dishes of each locality, region or region through which it passes, to enjoy tasting traditional stews that have been among us generations (and still survive). The best seafood, rich homemade desserts, typical country stews, meat and fish of the best quality ... the environment of the Camino de Santiago has much to offer, beyond hundreds of kilometers of trails and incredible landscapes.

If your plans are to travel the French Way soon, do not forget to list all these typical dishes and try them when you have the opportunity to make your day a little better, you will not regret it! On this occasion we focus only on the gastronomy that surrounds the French Way, but the Jacobean routes keep a much wider traditional kitchen than we will talk about soon.

What typical dishes of the Camino de Santiago should you try?

The typical cuisine of regions such as Navarra or Galicia, to name just two is so wide that trying to condense it into just a few recommendations is impossible. Personal tastes, of course, also come into play. That is why this list is simply a "start guide" of some dishes that the pilgrim should not miss on his trip to Santiago, although there are undoubtedly many more that are worthwhile.

Bacalao al ajoarriero | Wikimedia Commons

Bacalao al ajoarriero | Wikimedia Commons

Bacalao al ajoarriero (Navarra, Aragón, Castilla y León ...)

The ajoarriero cod is a traditional hot dish from the center-north of the peninsula, very typical in areas such as Navarra, Aragón or León, to name just a few. Its main ingredients are salted cod, green pepper, garlic, parsley, potatoes, lard, oil and salt, although there are several ways to prepare it (Navarre style, Manchego style ...). Although its origin is not very clear, it is related to the figure of the muleteers, former travelers in charge of transporting goods through the peninsula.

Patatas a la riojana | Wikimedia Commons

Patatas a la riojana | Wikimedia Commons

Patatas a la riojana (La Rioja)

One of the most "potent" dishes on our list of recommendations (and which we would appreciate to see after completing a stage of the Camino) are potatoes from La Rioja. It is a first dish (or only dish) modest and great flavor, which the day laborers of the field already took and which simply consists of a stew of potatoes cooked with chorizo, onion, garlic and peppers. Its preparation is simple, but the final result requires that the ingredients are of good quality.

Sopa de ajo | Wikimedia Commons

Sopa de ajo | Wikimedia Commons

Sopa de ajo (Castilla y León)

Garlic soup (also known as Castilian soup) is a typically Castilian dish from Leon, of humble origin and whose ingredients can vary according to the chef (traditionally he was throwing what was at hand). It consists of a soup made of water (or broth), bread, garlic, olive oil, bay leaf, sweet paprika, salt, pepper and poached egg, although some add ham or chorizo. Of common and cheap ingredients, it is one of the great wonders of the poor Spanish food and one of the typical dishes that you will find traveling the Jacobean route.

Lechazo asado | Wikimedia Commons

Lechazo asado | Wikimedia Commons

Roast lamb (Castilla y León)

Made in a wood oven in specialized grills, roast suckling lamb is one of the most popular traditional dishes of Castilla y León. Served in clay pots, the difference with the roast lamb is that the lamb comes from a lamb still unweaned, its preparation being an art in the kitchen.

Cocido maragato | Wikimedia Commons

Cocido maragato | Wikimedia Commons

Cocido maragato (Castile and León)

Similar to cocido madrileño or cocido lebaniego, cocido maragato is one of the most traditional hot dishes in the province of León, from the region of Maragatería (hence its name). It is a stew of the people of the countryside, a strong dish to give energy for a whole day's work. It consists of a soup, with chickpeas, cabbages and several types of meat of the cow or the pig, being one of its peculiarities that is served upside down that other cooked: first the meat, then the chickpeas and finally, the soup.

Pulpo a feira | Wikimedia Commons

Pulpo a feira | Wikimedia Commons

Pulpo a feira (Galicia)

The octopus a feira or simply may be the most characteristic dish of all Galician cuisine along with the traditional pie, very popular at parties and fairs, where it serves as a tapa. It consists of a whole octopus cooked (until not long ago in copper pot) to soften its hard meat that is served in slices, accompanied by forget oil, fat salt and paprika. Although traditionally we associate the "octopus to the Galician" with sliced ​​potatoes, the truth is that this custom is more typical of the rest of Spain than Galicia.

Caldo gallego | Wikimedia Commons

Caldo gallego | Wikimedia Commons

Galician stock (Galicia)

The Galician soup is another of the best known dishes of all Galician gastronomy and at the same time one of the simplest (and healthiest), very popular in the coldest months of the year, when it is taken in a bowl or deep dish. It consists of a soup of cooked vegetables, such as turnip greens, cabbages, cabbages, etc., in addition to potatoes or aluvias to which pork fat is added (also bacon or sausage) to give it its particular flavor. The truth is that there are many variants of the Galician soup, all of them suitable to warm the pilgrim after a hard day of Camino.

Tarta de Santiago | Wikimedia Commons

Tarta de Santiago | Wikimedia Commons

Tarta de Santiago (Galicia)

It is almost obligatory to taste the Santiago cake when you arrive in the city of the Apostle, a legendary dessert that can be found in almost all the pastry shops (not only in Galicia, but also in many other places along the Camino de Santiago). The cake of Santiago, by definition one of the typical dishes of the Camino de Santiago, carries almonds, eggs, sugar, lemon zest and butter.

Filloas | Wikimedia Commons

Filloas | Wikimedia Commons

Filloas (Galicia)

It is another great and typical dessert of Galician cuisine, very similar to the French crepes (there is some conflict over which of the two desserts arrived before the tables). The pancakes are traditional from the time of carnivals normally stuffed with sweet, although originally they included blood of the slaughter. Among its ingredients, is the egg, the arina or the oil and they are usually made with both cooked broth and milk.

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albe
albe 25/08/18 12:30:35
10
El caldo gallego me cautivo al igual que una ensalada con queso de ARZUA y nueces
1 0
Sin avatar
Alain Juncy 24/08/18 17:35:25
30
Si, la gastronomía del camino existe como lo explicáis muy bien. Pero tampoco hay que olvidar que el "menu del peregrino" existe también en casi todos los restaurantes del camino: macarrones, lentejas, lomo de cerdo o pollo a la plancha, etc...y que es el menu de 80 % de los peregrinos...
3 0
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